Federal judiciary declines to extend cameras in courts program

The ability for the public to view the judicial branch in action took a step backward this week. After a four-year pilot program in which 14 federal trial courts voluntarily recorded and published civil proceedings online, the federal judiciary decided to not continue the program. The full report can be found here.

In recommending to maintain the current ban on cameras in federal district courts, the Committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States cited the affect of cameras on witnesses, low levels of interest, and high costs, according to The Washington Post.

Fix the Court, a national organization committed to court access and transparency, responded to the recent decision. Fix the Court’s executive director Gabe Roth said:

“This is a disappointing decision, as the benefits of video-recording federal trials are obvious to any one of hundreds of thousands of people across the country who watched the proceedings recorded during the pilot.”

Unlike federal trial courts, federal appellate courts have progressed in their openness. All 13 federal circuits record audio of court proceedings, and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second and Ninth Circuits permit video coverage.

The U.S. Supreme Court continues to remain resistant to public accountability, fighting efforts to open the nation’s highest court. The high court sustains a strict no camera or audio recording policy for members of the public. The Court itself records oral arguments, but the recordings are typically not published until the end of each week. The Court released same-day recording in April 2015 for the Obergefell v. Hodges same-sex marriage case. However, the Court did not publish same-day recordings for the Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt abortion case earlier in March.

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